Tonic
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November 25, 2013 Design
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The N00b Designer

There’s a reason that ‘real-time experience’ is specified upon so much and is called so. Design school prepares you for a lot of things – it gets you comfortable with the softwares you’re going to use on a daily basis; it builds an aesthetic sense in you; it allows you to look at a visual and see more than just the message: the balance, the cleanliness, the typefaces; it inculcates an understanding of a brand, and the importance of colours, lines, points and blank spaces in building an identity; it gives you the ability to visualize a representation for an idea that would make it clear and desired by the world.

What design school does not prepare you for is, the pressure. Sheer mind-boggling, “oh my god, I’m going to die! How is this going to be possible? I need some help with this! I’m going to let the client and the firm down and we’ll lose these guys, unless I deliver right now! What am I going to do? What kind of pickle have I gotten myself into. How could you be so stupid, man! Buckle up human or we’re going to absolutely DIE!” pressure.

Thirty five distinct designs in 1200*627 pixels. Not happening. That’s just an impossible number of designs to churn out in a day. Well, guess what? I ended up making 31. Natasha (our Creative Director) helped me out with the last few. You’d think I’d maxed myself out. I ended up making a few more posts (404*404 pixels), and 2 cover photos (851*315 pixels) before I left for home.

A few months ago, I wouldn’t even have bothered trying to complete that many creatives. It’s just an impossible number, and it’s not possible for anyone, least of all me.

I used to take a whole day to make a poster. Today, I work on one brand for half a day, switch to a second brand, switch back to the first brand for changes, start visualizing on a logo for a third brand, take a break from the second brand to do some work for a fourth brand, get back to the second brand, finally push some work off to tomorrow and then get home. And amidst all this, the quality does not suffer. If it does, which is very rarely, then it’s sent back to me and I have to change the design until the quality is above par.

This is what a real time Graphic Designer’s job does to you. It takes a laidback person, like me, who enjoys his visualization time, puts him in the most chilled-out intense high-pressure environment there ever was, and transforms him into someone who doesn’t crumple into a ball, at the thought of an unthinkable number of designs in one day. They’re doable. It’s all doable, in the end..

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